Tea anyone?
I liked the sketch okay is that a bad thing? Using this one for his ref sheet later if I ever get around it orz;; Never getting tired of Maxwell nvm me

I liked the sketch okay is that a bad thing?
Using this one for his ref sheet later if I ever get around it orz;;
Never getting tired of Maxwell nvm me

bikiniarmorbattledamage:

quoms:

cupiscent:

petermorwood:

ancientpanoply:

A video made for the Museum of Cluny, and its “The Sword: Uses, Myths and Symbols” exhibit. It tries to dispel some of the beliefs that are still prevalent today about the weight and mobility of fighters in plate armor and show some of the techniques used in combat against armored opponents

I’m always pleased to see videos like this. It’s as if people won’t believe unless they’re shown (and there are always some who go “ah, yes, well, in aluminium stage armour it’s easy.”)

Well, the Museum Cluny video, like the Royal Armoury demo team, uses real steel armour: those two pictures at the start show the originals; the video uses reproductions because no curator will let someone take two exhibits from his museum and roll them around on flagstones. Mike Loades in the UK has been doing similar armour demonstrations for years, as has Tobias Capwell of the Wallace Collection. Eventually the old “clunky, immobile, in with a wrench, out with a can-opener” image of plate armour will go away – but I won’t hold my breath. (That shade of purple isn’t a good complexion anyway…)

Even the faster demonstrations of these combat techniques are still dialled back to about half speed. Try to visualise how much quicker and more brutal this would be if the two fighters meant business, when the first rule was Do It To Him As Quickly As Possible Before He Does It To You.

Writer and swordsman Guy Windsor writes about doing motion-capture work for a computer game; his completely authentic techniques couldn’t be used because they were so small, fast and economical. The game needed big swashing movements because the real thing looked unrealistic, too insignificant to be effective…

You won’t see a “killing fight” (full speed, full power, full intent) recreated very often, either on documentaries or in museum exhibitions, because it’s very, very dangerous for (when you think about it) obvious reasons. These techniques from 600-year-old fight manuals were how men in armour maimed and killed other men in armour - and since they’re the original material, not a re-interpretation after 600 years of being diluted down to sport-safe levels, the techniques will still maim and kill men in armour. Even a blunt “safe” sword is pointed enough (first demo on the video, 1:54-59) to go into a helmet’s eye-slot and through the skull inside…

But if you’re lucky enough to see a full-speed demo between fighters in real armour using wasters (wooden practice swords), be prepared to pick your jaw up from the floor. It is awesome. And also as scary as hell.

Comments on comments:

"Pretty much proof positive that the people who claim that skimpy female fantasy armor is for increased maneuverability don’t know what they’re talking about."

They know exactly what they’re talking about. They want to see T&A on fantasy game and book covers, and since they don’t have the balls to be honest about it, this is their excuse.

It amazes me that the old saws about Western armour and techniques are still going about, because surely two minutes’ thought would let you know that of course knights had to be able to get up off the ground…  Europeans were wearing armour for centuries, why wouldn’t they develop techniques of fighting in it?

It’s easier to laugh (do the same people laugh about samurai?) and repeat what “everyone knows about armour" than it is to waste that two minutes thought. Thinking might reveal something to mess with set opinions, and that would be annoying…

Biggest pet peeve: People commenting on the weight and shape of armour restricting mobility…

As before - “everybody knows" that European armour is massive and clunky because that’s what "everybody knows.” God forbid they should ever apply the “if it was so useless then why was it used" logic to anything. Because then they might realise that what "everybody knows" is wrong.

I’m going off to (not) hold my breath for a while… :-P

I saw this video in the fascinating special exhibit at Cluny last time we were in Paris. So pleased to be able to have it on tap, because it was most excellent.

image

As previously mentioned, the most important factors in considering armor design for a character are:

  • What does it have to protect them against?
  • What do they have to be able to do?
  • What is available?

These suits are show casing some great armor made for a person who needs to protect themselves against swords and arrows, fight and lead troops on the battlefield and had access to a lot of money and an skilled armorer.  Unsurprisingly, they are super practical for their intended purpose.

The argument that they might wanted to trade off protection for a little more speed doesn’t hold up because once these guys got into battle it was simply ridiculous to think they’d be able to keep track everywhere an attack might come from.

Basically if you want to survive a battle, you want to be as well protected as possible, and as that video shows: The upper limit to how well protected you can be and still move freely is pretty damn high!

- wincenworks

Biology’s cruel joke goes something like this: As a teenage body goes through puberty, its circadian rhythm essentially shifts three hours backward. Suddenly, going to bed at nine or ten o’clock at night isn’t just a drag, but close to a biological impossibility. Studies of teenagers around the globe have found that adolescent brains do not start releasing melatonin until around eleven o’clock at night and keep pumping out the hormone well past sunrise. Adults, meanwhile, have little-to-no melatonin in their bodies when they wake up. With all that melatonin surging through their bloodstream, teenagers who are forced to be awake before eight in the morning are often barely alert and want nothing more than to give in to their body’s demands and fall back asleep. Because of the shift in their circadian rhythm, asking a teenager to perform well in a classroom during the early morning is like asking him or her to fly across the country and instantly adjust to the new time zone — and then do the same thing every night, for four years.

Sleep and the teenage brain (via explore-blog)

This is why you have every right to be tired.  

(via lookrainbows)

Researchers now see sleep problems as a cause, and not a side effect, of teenage depression.” - from the artcle! 

(via scruffyshezza)

Started watching Zankyou no Terror and loving it already. ;u;

zzzeal:

Shoutout to all the artists on Tumblr who work on something for weeks and only get 4 notes

Shoutout to all the artists on Youtube who do amazing speedpaints and, if they’re lucky, will get 500 views

Shoutout to all underappreciated artists who do amazing work and receive no recognition

Reblog this if you are literally suprised when people find you attractive.
Reblog if you lick or bite your lips, a lot.

fuark-off:

and if you automatically did either one of the two, or both, don’t even fucking hesitate

Plotting Tool: Death by Surprise

kamimcarthur:

With examples from Lord of the Rings, Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood, Dragon Ball Z, and The Hunger Games.
image


Today I’m bringing you a plotting technique I call “Death by Surprise,” and it works as a great pinch to your readers. It can give them a twinge of suspense, shock, dread, and sorrow all at once. It works like this:

Your character is battling his way through your story, facing villain, monsters, or whatever kind of obstacles you are throwing his way. Then something out of the blue actually inflicts a fatal wound to him. It’s something the character (and maybe the reader too) never saw coming. The intensity of this plotting technique comes from the shock and surprise the character has as he realizes, he’s come so far only to die from this.

Let’s look at examples to see some different ways “Death by Surprise” can be done, then at why it works, and how you can mess it up.

Example 1:

In the Lord of the Rings films, Frodo suffers all kinds of ailments and faces all kinds of enemies; he even makes it into Mordor and through Shelob’s lair. Just when he thinks he’s safe from the giant spider, it stings him.

It’s not completely out of the blue, but Frodo doesn’t expect it. We’ve watched him come so far, so it’s painful to see him get stung. It’s like—how can that happen? Now? When he’s so close?

In this example, the audience sees Shelob sneaking up on him, but Frodo doesn’t (that creates an added layer of suspense). It’s not a surprise for us, but it is for Frodo. That moment is like a pinch to me every time.

image

Example 2:

In Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, protagonist Edward Elric battles villains with alchemy. We’ve watched him overcome all kinds of fights with bad guys, and we’ve watched him overcome his own personal obstacles—the death of his mom, the abandonment from his father, the loss of two of his limbs, his complicated feelings over the predicament of his brother. We know how iron-willed Edward is. Nothing stops him. He works to overcome whatever life throws at him, all without whining.

In one episode, Edward uses alchemy to make damp dynamite explode, finally defeating some henchmen. He (and the audience) thinks he’s overcome an obstacle once again only to realize a second later that a spike of wood from the blast has pierced straight through him, pinning him to the ground.

And he’s going to die.

It’s so unexpected. It’s like a freak accident. And it’s going to do our hero in. And the tragic irony of it is that it’s an accident he inflicted on himself. It’s like, how the heck did that just happen?!

In this example, because the audience doesn’t see it coming, we’re just as shocked as Ed.

image

Read More

Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (via hqlines)

darthxinvader:

Realistic 

1)  The day my sister got back from the hospital after a suicide attempt. I didnt let go for about an hour.

2) Kid just found out his brother was shot and killed.

3) A Russian war veteran kneels beside the tank he spent the war in, now a monument.

4) Man sobbing at animal shelter. After being jailed briefly and his dog Buzz Lightyear impounded he couldn’t afford the $400 to get his pet back.

5) A firefighter gives water to a koala during the devastating Black Saturday bushfires that burned across Victoria, Australia, in 2009.

6) Alcoholic father with his son

7) Robert Peraza pauses at his son’s name on the 9/11 Memorial during the tenth anniversary ceremonies at the site of the World Trade Center.

8) Greg Cook hugs his dog Coco after finding her inside his destroyed home in Alabama following the Tornado in March, 2012

9) After two double lung transplants and years of battling cystic fibrosis, my good friend passed away last Saturday. This was one of the last pics taken with his mother.

These are probably some of the most powerful pictures I’ve ever seen and some hit close to home.

please reblog if

zankiyo:

you post the following:

reblogs only please, it makes it easier for me and helps me find more blogs, even if you post one of these, i’ll follow

(some of you may know me from my main blog chikyuus)

  • anime
  • anime pls
  • zankyou no terror
  • dmmd
  • tokyo ghoul
  • free!
  • love stage!!
  • anime scenery
  • cute food 
  • pastel stuff/cute stuff
  • anime food
  • gifs of anime
  • art
  • fashion
  • anime movies
  • anime
  • did i mention anime
waitingfortheecstasy:

male hair curly: my favorite style

waitingfortheecstasy:

male hair curly: my favorite style

science-for-a-star:

Lip Service preview, from Warbird line.

science-for-a-star:

Lip Service preview, from Warbird line.